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The Bible Denies the Divinity of Jesus (part 7 of 7): God and Jesus Are Two Separate Beings

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Description: Many people use certain verses of the Bible as proof that Jesus is God.  However, all of these verses, when understood in context, prove the opposite!

  • By Shabir Ally
  • Published on 07 Jan 2008
  • Last modified on 19 Feb 2008
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For example, in Matthew 9:2, Jesus said to a certain man, “Take heart, son; your sins are forgiven.”  Because of this, some say that Jesus must be God since only God can forgive sins.  However, if you are willing to read just a few verses further, you will find that the people “...praised God, who had given such authority to men.” (Matthew 9:8).  This shows that the people knew, and Matthew agrees, that Jesus is not the only man to receive such authority from God.

Jesus himself emphasized that he does not speak on his own authority (John 14:10) and he does nothing on his own authority, but he speaks only what the Father has taught him (John 8:28).  What Jesus did here was as follows.  Jesus announced to the man the knowledge Jesus received from God that God had forgiven the man.

Notice that Jesus did not say, “I forgive your sins,” but rather, “your sins are forgiven,” implying, as this would to his Jewish listeners, that God had forgiven the man.  Jesus, then, did not have the power to forgive sins, and in that very episode he called himself “the Son of Man” (Matthew 9:6).

John 10:30 is often used as proof that Jesus is God because Jesus said, “I and the father are one.”  But, if you read the next six verses, you will find Jesus explaining that his enemies were wrong to think that he was claiming to be God.  What Jesus obviously means here is that he is one with the Father in purpose.  Jesus also prayed that his disciples should be one just as Jesus and the Father are one.  Obviously, he was not praying that all his disciples should somehow merge into one individual (see John 17:11 and 22).  And when Luke reports that the disciples were all one, Luke does not mean that they became one single human being, but that they shared a common purpose although they were separate beings (see Acts 4:32).  In terms of essence, Jesus and the Father are two, for Jesus said they are two witnesses (John 8:14-18).  They have to be two, since one is greater than the other (see John 14:28).  When Jesus prayed to be saved from the cross, he said: “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.” (Luke 22:42).

This shows that they had two separate wills, although Jesus submitted his will to the will of the Father.  Two wills mean two separate individuals.

Furthermore, Jesus is reported to have said: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matthew 27:46).  If one of them forsook the other, then they must be two separate entities.

Again, Jesus is reported to have said: “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.” (Luke 23:46).  If the spirit of one can be placed into the hands of another, they must be two separate beings.

In all of these instances, Jesus is clearly subordinate to the Father.  When Jesus knelt down and prayed he obviously was not praying to himself (see Luke 22:41).  He was praying to his God.

Throughout the New Testament, the Father alone is called God.  In fact, the titles “Father” and “God” are used to designate one individual, not three, and never Jesus.  This is also clear from the fact that Matthew substituted the title “Father” in the place of the title “God” in at least two places in his Gospel (compare Matthew 10:29 with Luke 12:6, and Matthew 12:50 with Mark 3:35).  If Matthew is right in doing so, then the Father alone is God.

Was Jesus the Father?  No! Because Jesus said: “And do not call anyone on earth ‘father,’ for you have one Father, and he is in heaven.” (Matthew 23:9).  So Jesus is not the Father, since Jesus was standing on the earth when he said this.

The Quran seeks to bring people back to the true faith that was taught by Jesus, and by his true disciples who continued in his teaching.  That teaching emphasized a continued commitment to the first commandment that God is alone.  In the Quran, God directs Muslims to call readers of the Bible back to that true faith.  God have said in the Quran:

Say: “O people of the Book (Christians and Jews)!  Come to a word that is just between us and you: that we shall worship none but God, and that we shall associate no partners with Him, and that none of us shall take others as lords beside God.”  (Quran, 3:64)

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